Gravitational Physics


course ID

Lecturer

CFU

6

Length

14 Weeks

Semester DD

Second


Course details

Newtonian gravitation (Potential theory, Newtonian fluid dynamics, Conserved quantities - Bodies with spherical/non-spherical symmetry, Geodesy, Tides - Keplerian motion, Perturbative methods - Tests of inverse-square law, Measurements of G). Foundations (Equivalence Principle (WEP, EEP, SEP) and its experimental tests). Post-Newtonian gravitation (PPN formalism, Main PPN effects, Equations of motion, Gravitomagnetism, PPN effects around Earth). Experimental tests of PPN gravitation (Gravitational test mass, Tracking techniques (SLR, radiometric), Geodetic satellites, Satellite dynamics in Earth orbit, Reference frames, POD of geodynamic satellites, GNSS, LLR, Cassini and other deep-space missions, BepiColombo, ISA).

Tests of General Relativity with radio observations of binary neutron star systems. Pulsar Timing: relativistic corrections to Time of Arrivals. Post Keplerian parameters in the PPN formalism. Observational results from some peculiar systems: PSR B1913+16; PSR B1534+12; PSR J0737−3039A/B. Basics on gravitational waves. Description of the dynamic evolution of a binary system of compact objects in the PPN formalism. Tests of General Relativity: waveform consistency; massive graviton; speed of GWs; equivalence principle; polarization states.

Objectives

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

The class is aimed at providing an advanced preparation on Physics, in particular in the field of experimental gravitation. The educational objectives include knowledge of relativistic physics and experimental methods for the verification of the different metric theories of gravitation.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:

Students will have to demonstrate a good understanding of the most important theories of gravitation and related experimental problems. The verification of knowledge and understanding is done through an oral test.

APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING:

Students must be able to identify the essential elements of a physical problem (even a complex one) and learn how to create an approximate model. They must be able to update these models by comparing them with existing experimental data.

MAKING JUDGEMENTS:

Students must be able to perform bibliographic searches and to select interesting materials, particularly on the WEB.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS:

Students must be able to work in groups (even interdisciplinary) and be able to present their research work to an audience of both specialists and outsiders.

LEARNING SKILLS:

Students must be able to learn the necessary skills in new fields independently. They must acquire the ability to continue their studies in a research doctorate or other post-graduate schools.